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's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. thank you very much. [applause] thank you, all. our class of commissioners for 2012. 14 commissions. thank you very much. i'm derek, i'm hyungry, and ready to eat. these vendors offer a variety of the streets near you. these mobile restaurants are serving up original, creative and unusual combinations. you can grab something simple like a grilled cheese sandwich or something unique like curry. we areher here in the average eight -- upper haight. you will be competing in the quick buy food challenge. an appetizer and if you are the winner you will ge
that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and then i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of a member of the city college board of trustees for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, if i could present to you, rodrigo santos, the newest member of our board of trustees. [applause] >> i am honored for this great appointment. as a new member of the board of trustees, i can tell you i will do everything in my power to ensure not only do we follow the great work of former trustee milton marks. that great legacy of public service. but at the same time, i join an institution that must be saved, an institution that must be preserved.
expand? interestingly moscone is probably the most successful convention center in the united states. it's not the largest. but persquare foot, it's the most utilized. per square foot it generated the most hotel nights and most revenue of any convention center in the united states. so it's very significant in terms of economic impact. it's basically full-year round. a lost our groups are outgrowing it and need more space in order to stay in town and this benefits not only the tourist sector, but the business sector. it's no coincide that the apple 5 was unveiled there this week or oracle is having their meeting next week. it's the best way to generate more business. the economic impact of the center is significant. we have calculated that we have lost $2 billion in spending because the building is not big enough and people have left. people that want to meet in san francisco or come back over a regular cycle are not able to meet here because it's too small. so we have to expand and once we do, it will create jobs, revenue and taxes for the city. we have a whole expansion team. it's' p
. in the united states, the richest 1% owned 38% of all wealth. the bottom 90% hold 73% of all debt. we are wiping out the planet and the public is left holding the bag. we definitely need something completely different. putting the moral outrage aside for a second, this situation also puts cities at great risk. we've only gotten a taste of the destruction that -- disruption as possible with the numerous revolutions that broke out. the crisis will land hardest in cities. i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see the boys and a critical state. it is a new situation. 50% of global population is urban, young, and connected by mobile phones. the young are the hardest hit here. in spain, the unemployment rate for young adults is around 50%. in the united states, college graduates are leaving school with an average of $24,000 in student loan debt into labor market for their age group that has not been as bad as it is today since the depression or the 1940's. the smallest thing can trigger a crisis now. it is a powder keg. on the other hand, along with this crisis is a powerful new se
more supervision than we typically get in the united states. it's usually much more cost-effective to manage them outside of a facility with high scrutiny than it is to incarcerate. as you probably know, california spends about eight times as much money for every inmate as it does for every student in the university of california system. and so you could reorganize those resources and put they will more towards supervision and other types of things and manage a lot of those individuals that are currently incarcerated in a much more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but bein
of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called my city way, which is working on intermodal transport. started in new york, now in 35 cities around the country and many cities around the world provided information to not only our customers, but also anyone interested in moving from a to be in a city. that has worked exceedingly well. as you have seen, we have been investing in other companies as well. the electric charging stations system is another one of those. as is our first in this and in parking. most of us leave our house is in the morning, go to work, part of our cars at work, leave a vacant parking space at home. if you can bring a marketplace together where someone can park under drive during the day, and of course, give them a certainty of where they will part, it works. many thousands of customers now are enjoying that has a potential different way of operating in the city. drive now was
the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact the task force for speaking engagements? >> if you call and ask to speak to jim miller.
of recovery. his city is a model for the rest of the united states to emulate. the honorable edwin lee. [applause] ç>> thank you. next time i see mayor willie brown, i will remind him it was fema. [laughter] we will have to name a doorway in addition to the staircase. thank you, everyone, for coming to san francisco. it is a pleasure to receive new and open up our house and to have you discuss, plan, and create relationships perhaps you do not have today among the federal and local police -- agencies working together on recovery. our city has been working hard. we have seen the future. the future is that if we're not prepared, it will not be our future. i got a glimpse of that some years ago when staff and i went down to new orleans. we have begun to realize the devastation was the result of things that could have been done there are national lessons to be learned from any major disaster across our country, what we could have done better. when i visited there those years ago, we stood at the night éovardç -- at the ninthç ward. in addition to taking pictures, we just stood there
record 98 disasters declared in the united states. about 0.5% or five of those, we deployed in federal disaster recovery coordinator to work with the communities and works through the issues. we still have folks out there from hud and other agencies providing recover its support functions. whether it is presidentially declared or not, who do you need out there immediately to have your communityñr and the citizes taking care of as it looks to rebuild? this can go on on a daily basis in the things you do. çwhenever there is a house fir, we see the red cross helping to make sure people have immediate needs taken care of. last year with hurricane irene along the eastç coast, we have3 states impacted by that. there was all the work that had to happen with the crossing over and integrating of support functions providing resources needed for the communities we did needed by the committees for recovery. i have gone on for quite a while. i wanted to set the stage for you and encourage you to dialogue. bring your comments. i hope i have stirred up some pots, things you want to know more abo
for automotive loans. today, basically 80% of all the loans in the united states are processed through their software. we will see much more of this. we want to talk about not as public companies, tons of this. all of these guys uses the original cloud service. a lot of people have asked me why we call it a cloud. what does this come from? it is pretty simple. in the old days of client-server computing -- some of us were around them -- we would draw a picture of a pc, a picture of a unix server, and then a picture of a little clout in between. mostly because none of us understood how networks work. for the old folks in the room, you may remember certain words. this is all communication technology developed for corporations to build their own networks. that sounds like crazy talk today, right? nobody does that anymore. everybody is using ip, mpls- based networks. that is the network cloud. the network guys realize that in order to build a network service, they had to put these things called switches and routers in a room that had high quality power, guard dogs out front, and not located
could generated synthetically a ton of load coming from multiple sites around united states to simulate every case i just told you about. you technologically could have done that. economically, it would have cost you an arm and leg to do this. which is why nobody did it. today, a whole host of guys are saying, would you like 10,000 computers for three days to generate a ton of synthetic load and hit all these giant websites? you could have that you only have to buy it for three days because they have delivered -- amazon among others has done this. you want to beat a student of this, it to be a student of business models. they have a concept called reserve pricing, meaning if you think you're going to use it for a year, they a little but up front, and they will take the hourly rate down. then they have a fascinating thing called spot pricing, which means that every hour, we can all go bid on whatever excess capacity there is. each you are the high bidder, you get it. there are a lot of interesting applications for this, by the way. this innovation and business model has not stopped. they
ever done in the united states. narrator: small-scale projects like nine mile run have far-reaching environmental impact. but they're just one part of the regional wet weather control plan. schombert: this region needs to solve its problem by 2026. that's not that long away. this is the largest public works project ever undertaken in this region. lichte: you're looking at significant infrastructure. either tunnels or storage tanks, or, you know, treatment facilities. the cost is about $3 billion. lichte: if you look at some of the other cities that have gone through this, their rates have gone up significantly. the federal government provides a number of grant programs but the bottom line is, you know, it's not enough. there's a massive need of money out there for wastewater and water infrastructure improvements around the country. narrator: the struggle for funds is as great in small towns as it is in metropolitan areas. oberstar: the federal government has let down municipalities. the first investment under the '72 clean water act was to deal with the biggest waste stream
's going to take all of us to get this united states back where it belongs. we're not there yet, but we can be there. grumbles: water is america's greatest liquid asset. and citizens and governments all need to be reminded of that from time to time. woman: what can individuals do to make a difference? allbee: we need to accept the responsibility that future generations need to be able to rely on those assets to have the same quality of life that we have. oberstar: all the water there ever was or ever will be is here on earth today and it's our responsibility now, at this time, in this generation, to protect it. that must be our legacy to the future. ♪ >> welcome to hamilton recreation and aquatics center. it is the only facility that has an integrated swimming pool and recreation center combined. we have to pools, the city's water slide, for little kids and those of you that are more daring and want to try the rockslide, we have a drop slide. >> exercises for everybody. hi have a great time. the ladies and guys that come, it is for the community and we really make it fun. people think it
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14

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